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About frozen shoulder

About frozen shoulder

Frozen shoulder, also known as adhesive capsulitis, is a condition characterized by stiffness and pain in your shoulder joint. Signs and symptoms typically begin gradually, worsen over time and then resolve, usually within one to three years.

Symptoms of frozen shoulder

Symptoms of frozen shoulder

Frozen shoulder typically develops slowly, and in three stages. Each stage can last a number of months.

 

 

Causes of frozen shoulder

Causes of frozen shoulder

The bones, ligaments and tendons that make up your shoulder joint are encased in a capsule of connective tissue. Frozen shoulder occurs when this capsule thickens and tightens around the shoulder joint, restricting its movement.

 

Doctors aren’t sure why this happens to some people, although it’s more likely to occur in people who have diabetes or those who recently had to immobilize their shoulder for a long period, such as after surgery or an arm fracture.

 

Risk factors

Treatment of frozen shoulder

Treatment of frozen shoulder

Most frozen shoulder treatment involves controlling shoulder pain and preserving as much range of motion in the shoulder as possible.

 

Treatment protocols include:

FAQ
FAQ

Most frozen shoulders get better on their own within 12 to 18 months.

Whether treated or not, the majority of frozen shoulders improve on their own over the course of 6 to 12 months, but sometimes it can be up to 18 months.

Synovial fluid enables the joint to move without friction. Frozen shoulder  happens when scar tissue forms in the shoulder. This causes the shoulder joint to thicken and tighten, leaving less room for movement. 

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